Silent, massive bronze lions guard the entrance to the Dingle Tower, staring across the Northwest Arm at the campuses of Dalhouise University and Saint Mary's University on the other side atop the crest.

Silent, massive bronze lions guard the entrance to the Dingle Tower, staring across the Northwest Arm at the campuses of Dalhouise University and Saint Mary’s University on the other side atop the crest.

It’s easy to forget how beautiful this place — Nova Scotia — really is, especially when you’re from here and you visit two or three times a year. You drive past things on a routine basis that other people would stop and stare at for hours.

 

As promised. A snap from Peggy’s Cove. Classic Nova Scotia view.

 Like that picture I posted yesterday from my father in law’s front yard, of East Bay of the Bras d’dor lakes.

 

Cape Blomidon as seen from Grande Pre beach.

 So yesterday afternoon I had a little time and for no reason other than acting on a whim, I went to what the locals call the Dingle Park, which is actually Fleming Park, in west end Halifax and climbed the tower there. It’s an old stone edifice built in 1912 to mark Halifax as the birthplace of responsible government in the British Empire. And that’s what you’re looking at below.

The tower and the view from the top, looking east out to sea, up the Northwest Arm, where as a younger man I logged many hours as a deck hand on friends’ sailboats moving in and out of the arm either to more open waters or back to a safe mooring.

As a bit of an experiment today I’m going to try to add a picture or two during the day of our travels. We are going to Peggy’s Cove for lunch — a place I’ve been a hundred times but that never gets old — and then we are off to Wolfville, NS, which the signs will tell you is the Home of Acadia University and the Land of Evangeline.

Evangeline was the heroine of Longfellow’s epic poem recounting the Expulsion of the Acadians and how families were arbitrarily ripped apart and put on separate ships for redistribution along the US seaboard and as far south as Louisiana. All because the peaceful Acadian farmers would not swear alliegance to the British crown.

Anyway — lots of history there. Daylight willing, I’ll have a photo or two from Wolfville to add.

At least that’s my intent.

The Dingle Tower, and the view from the top, as seen on Nov 3, 2015. I was the only one there and it was a wonderful few minutes of quiet reflection. Just me and the wind.

The Dingle Tower, and the view from the top, as seen on Nov 3, 2015. I was the only one there and it was a wonderful few minutes of quiet reflection. Just me and the wind.

image